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AMELIORATED EFFECTS OF ALLIUM SATIVUM ON SUBCLINICAL LEAD TOXICITY IN GOATS 

K. BADIEI, K. MOSTAGHNI, A. NOWROOZIASL1 AND A. TABATABAEI NAEINI

Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, Shiraz, Iran,1School of Veterinary Medicine, Islamic Azad University, Kazeroun, Iran

Abstract

     The prophylactic efficacy of garlic (Allium sativum) to reduce tissue lead (Pb) concentration was evaluated experimentally in goats. Eight crossbred Iranian female goats were divided into two equal groups. Goats of group A received lead acetate orally at the dose rate of 80 mg/kg BW and group B received concurrent lead acetate orally at the dose rate of 80 mg/kg BW and dried garlic powder orally at the dose rate of 45 g/animal/day for 5 days. Mean serum lead concentration in group A goats was 0.13 ± 0.03 mg/ml before lead administration and 0.56 ± 0.04 mg/ml on 5th day, whereas in group B the concentration was 0.11 ± 0.02 mg/ml before treatment and 0.29 ± 0.02 mg/ml on the 5th day. Mean urine lead concentration in group A ranged between 0.05 ± 0.02 mg/ml before lead administration and 0.45 ± 0.07 mg/ml on the 5th day, whereas in group B it was 0.07 ± 0.01 mg/ml before treatment and 4.08 ± 0.93 mg/ml on the 5th day. The mean lead concentrations in bones, lungs, heart, liver, kidneys and skeletal muscles of group A following necropsy were 39.95 ± 6.94, 0.65 ± 0.06, 0.46 ± 0.07, 6.61 ± 0.74, 19.32 ± 2.17, 0.27 ± 0.06 mg/g of wet tissue, respectively. The respective values in group B were 17.77 ± 4.12, 0.20 ± 0.04, 0.20 ± 0.02, 1.45 ± 0.30, 2.37 ± 0.27 and 0.11 ± 0.01 mg/g of wet tissue. Thus, concurrent use of lead acetate and garlic dry powder reduced lead concentration considerably, indicating the potential activity of garlic against lead toxicity in goats. 

Key words: Allium sativum, lead, goats, blood, urine, tissues.

 
   

ISSN 0253-8318 (Print)
ISSN 2074-7764 (Online)



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