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Toxoplasmosis in the eastern grey kangaroo, Macropus giganteus and the cape hyrax, Procavis capensis, in Japan
 
Khaled Mohamed El-Dakhly1,4, Nagwan El-Habashi2, El-Shaymaa El-Nahass3,4, Hiroki Sakai4 and Tokuma Yanai4,*
1Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511, Egypt; 2Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kafr-El-Sheikh University, Egypt; 3Department of  Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511, Egypt; 4Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1193 Japan. *Corresponding author: yanai@gifu-u.ac.jp

Abstract   

Toxoplasmosis was investigated in an eastern grey kangaroo, Macropus giganteus, and four cape hyraxes, Procavia capensis, in a Japanese zoo. Clinically, the kangaroo showed neurological signs, emaciation, diarrhea, elevated AST and CK, and subjected to coma before death. One young cape hyrax had severe anorexia, while the other three died without exhibiting clinical signs. Grossly, lungs of the kangaroo were dark red in color, while hyraxes, besides, showed hepatic multifocal white foci, and intestinal multifocal hemorrhages. Histologically, the kangaroo had frequent Toxoplasma gondii pseudocysts in brain, heart and skeletal muscles. All hyraxes had multifocal necrosis with cysts containing numerous bradyzoites in liver and spleen, along with necrotic gastroenteritis and intestinal hemorrhages. Immunohistochemically, cysts showed positive reaction to anti-T. gondii antibodies. These findings indicate possible outbreaks of toxoplasmosis in eastern grey kangaroos and cape hyraxes, zoo habitants; therefore, they could be susceptible intermediate hosts for T. gondii in terms of zoonosis. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in eastern grey kangaroos and cape hyraxes in Japanese zoos.

Key words: Hyraxes, Japan, Kangaroos, Toxoplasma gondii, Zoo animals

 
   

ISSN 0253-8318 (Print)
ISSN 2074-7764 (Online)



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